Friday, September 18, 2009

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

FORCED Swine Flue Shots?

These numbers just don't add up

How many people have to be vaccinated with the new swine flu vaccine to save ONE life from a swine flu fatality?

If the vaccine were 100% effective (that is, they prevented every death that would have otherwise occurred), they could be credited with saving 1 life out of 2000, right?
Because that's the normal death rate for this particular virus (these figures are widely quoted by AP, Reuters and the White House, by the way).

But no vaccine is 100% effective. As I mentioned above, seasonal flu vaccines might -- at a stretch -- be credited with preventing 1% of the deaths that might otherwise have occurred.
With this 1% effectiveness factor calculated back into the formula for swine flu (assuming the same 1% effectiveness factor), it turns out that you would have to vaccinate 200,000 people to save ONE life from swine flu.

That puts a whole new perspective on the vaccine push, doesn't it?

200,000 vaccines costs taxpayers roughly $5,000,000, and it subjects 200,000 people to the potential side effects of these vaccines which have never been subjected to any long-term testing whatsoever.

Is it worth spending $5 million and exposing 200,000 people to potentially dangerous vaccine side effects in order to prevent ONE death from swine flu?

If each vaccine shot generates $25 in revenue for drug companies, and the U.S. government orders the production of 160 million vaccines,
how much money is Big Pharma making off the pandemic?
That answer is roughly $4 billion in net revenues.

But even that doesn't count all the repeat business from the future victims who suffer neurological side effects
from the vaccines and have to be institutionalized and subjected to high-dollar medical care for years on end.

In all, a mass vaccination program could
end up generating over ten billion dollars in revenues for drug companies.